July 6, 2014
darvinasafo:

Solidarity with our indigenous brothers and sisters.

darvinasafo:

Solidarity with our indigenous brothers and sisters.

July 6, 2014
angelwhite2013:

BLACK WAR   In the early 19th century, large numbers of Tasmanians were killed by white settlers.   When European settlement started in earnest in 1803 there had been 4,000 – 6,000 Tasmanian Aborigines, but by 1847 just 47 were left.   It’s claimed that the last known full-blood individual died in 1906.   The Tasmanians were unique in Australia – because they were the oldest surviving human group on the continent, descendants of the first wave of very early Aborigines who arrived in Australia more than 50,000 years ago.  Today, although there are no full blood Tasmanian Aborgines, there are up to 15,000 Tasmanians of part Aboriginal, part-British ancestry.  The last 47 Aborigines had been sent to Oyster Cove by the British colonial authorities in 1847 after the horrific Black War and a period of exile (1833 – 47) in terrible conditions on Flinders Island between mainland Australia and Tasmania.  The man who had persuaded them to go into exile for those 14 years was a Christian missionary, George Augustus Robinson, who largely abandoned them once he had escorted them to the island.  Of the 300 people went there, 253 died, mainly from disease, during the 14 year exile.

(David Keys – BBC History) 

A picture of the last four “full blooded” Tasmanian Aborigines c. 1860s. Truganini, the last to survive, is seated at far right.

angelwhite2013:

BLACK WAR   In the early 19th century, large numbers of Tasmanians were killed by white settlers.   When European settlement started in earnest in 1803 there had been 4,000 – 6,000 Tasmanian Aborigines, but by 1847 just 47 were left.   It’s claimed that the last known full-blood individual died in 1906.   The Tasmanians were unique in Australia – because they were the oldest surviving human group on the continent, descendants of the first wave of very early Aborigines who arrived in Australia more than 50,000 years ago.  Today, although there are no full blood Tasmanian Aborgines, there are up to 15,000 Tasmanians of part Aboriginal, part-British ancestry.  The last 47 Aborigines had been sent to Oyster Cove by the British colonial authorities in 1847 after the horrific Black War and a period of exile (1833 – 47) in terrible conditions on Flinders Island between mainland Australia and Tasmania.  The man who had persuaded them to go into exile for those 14 years was a Christian missionary, George Augustus Robinson, who largely abandoned them once he had escorted them to the island.  Of the 300 people went there, 253 died, mainly from disease, during the 14 year exile.

(David Keys – BBC History) 

A picture of the last four “full blooded” Tasmanian Aborigines c. 1860s. Truganini, the last to survive, is seated at far right.

January 27, 2014
I let myself get wrapped up in yesterday and I got angry at a mountain of things. Things that wont change, things that cant change and things that are so damn hard to change. You start to get the overwhelming feeling that you’re fighting a losing battle against Ignorance… and it wears you down!I was so angry before I even sat down to watch the film Utopia, which is unsettling to put it mildly but was nothing i didn’t expect to see. Point is I had a shitty day but it turned around and as i was reflecting last night, i realised its the same thing that always turns my day around.I got reminded of Vincent Lingiari and the Wave Hill walk off… I know this story inside out, but it always stops me in my tracks and makes me reflect - firstly because of the collective sense of unity and belief from the workers, their families and communities that they could change what needed to be changed and that they didn’t stop until they got what they were asking for - the Wave Hill walk off is still the longest strike in Australian history. Then there is Vincent Lingiari who to me represents the type of leader that anyone black or white should aspire to be - sadly our kids still don’t learn about him in school - they learn about MLK and Mandela but not Lingiari. You know how people say that this person or that person didn’t know at the time that there actions would continue to change peoples lives… Lingiari to me is different, even though he was a humble man, I always feel like he did know that what happened at Wave Hill would continue to be a catalyst for change for Indigenous people for years to come. There was some footage shown from the walk off that i cant recall if I’ve ever seen before, but yesterday it really captured me - the reporter was asking one man about what they wanted etc, then he asked him if all the families and workers supported them, the man said yes, he asked if communities supported them and the man said yes, then he asked if the whole of the Northern Territory would support them and the man said yes and that was it. The thing that inspires me most about Wave Hill is that today - in my lifetime - I know men and women who are leaders like Lingiari, they work tirelessly because they know that change in our communities will happen eventually and they know that they are supported by our communities.Im paraphrasing here but one old aunty was responding about racism and she said that the reason we don’t respond with violence and the reason we keep moving is because we have too much dignity. As soon as she said it, it picked me straight up. Truth is Indigenous people aren’t defined by stereotypes, ignorance, struggle, statistics or anything that the media says. We are defined by two things only Resistance and Dignity.I got more then a few facebook deletions yesterday - but I wont apologise for the things that I write, its how I feel and not intended to offend you. My whole identity is as an Aboriginal woman and as an Aboriginal and as a woman, that may seem like double dutch but its true, these 3 things sit on par with each other at the top. Its difficult to explain to people who live with the idea that everyone is Australian that the part of me that identifies as Australian is very insignificant - to me its 9 or 10 letters that you fill in a box - nationalism has never appealed to me, i believe that the world is a bigger place and the only things of importance here are the people in it and the land we live on - not boarders. I’m not saying that I’m better than you, Im saying that to me being Aboriginal is more than being Australian, and yesterday I was proud of being Aboriginal.

I let myself get wrapped up in yesterday and I got angry at a mountain of things. Things that wont change, things that cant change and things that are so damn hard to change. 
You start to get the overwhelming feeling that you’re fighting a losing battle against Ignorance… and it wears you down!

I was so angry before I even sat down to watch the film Utopia, which is unsettling to put it mildly but was nothing i didn’t expect to see. Point is I had a shitty day but it turned around and as i was reflecting last night, i realised its the same thing that always turns my day around.

I got reminded of Vincent Lingiari and the Wave Hill walk off… I know this story inside out, but it always stops me in my tracks and makes me reflect - firstly because of the collective sense of unity and belief from the workers, their families and communities that they could change what needed to be changed and that they didn’t stop until they got what they were asking for - the Wave Hill walk off is still the longest strike in Australian history. 

Then there is Vincent Lingiari who to me represents the type of leader that anyone black or white should aspire to be - sadly our kids still don’t learn about him in school - they learn about MLK and Mandela but not Lingiari. You know how people say that this person or that person didn’t know at the time that there actions would continue to change peoples lives… Lingiari to me is different, even though he was a humble man, I always feel like he did know that what happened at Wave Hill would continue to be a catalyst for change for Indigenous people for years to come. 

There was some footage shown from the walk off that i cant recall if I’ve ever seen before, but yesterday it really captured me - the reporter was asking one man about what they wanted etc, then he asked him if all the families and workers supported them, the man said yes, he asked if communities supported them and the man said yes, then he asked if the whole of the Northern Territory would support them and the man said yes and that was it. 

The thing that inspires me most about Wave Hill is that today - in my lifetime - I know men and women who are leaders like Lingiari, they work tirelessly because they know that change in our communities will happen eventually and they know that they are supported by our communities.

Im paraphrasing here but one old aunty was responding about racism and she said that the reason we don’t respond with violence and the reason we keep moving is because we have too much dignity. As soon as she said it, it picked me straight up. 
Truth is Indigenous people aren’t defined by stereotypes, ignorance, struggle, statistics or anything that the media says. We are defined by two things only Resistance and Dignity.

I got more then a few facebook deletions yesterday - but I wont apologise for the things that I write, its how I feel and not intended to offend you. My whole identity is as an Aboriginal woman and as an Aboriginal and as a woman, that may seem like double dutch but its true, these 3 things sit on par with each other at the top. Its difficult to explain to people who live with the idea that everyone is Australian that the part of me that identifies as Australian is very insignificant - to me its 9 or 10 letters that you fill in a box - nationalism has never appealed to me, i believe that the world is a bigger place and the only things of importance here are the people in it and the land we live on - not boarders.

I’m not saying that I’m better than you, Im saying that to me being Aboriginal is more than being Australian, and yesterday I was proud of being Aboriginal.

January 26, 2014
Just when you thought white Australians couldn’t get anymore racist and disrespectful! I can’t even…

Just when you thought white Australians couldn’t get anymore racist and disrespectful! I can’t even…

January 24, 2014
Invasion Day. Survival Day. Australia Day.

I know there are so many people out there who don’t really understand Aboriginal peoples feeling about Australia Day or how we justify calling the “National Day” Invasion Day or Survival Day.

I thought Id share this ABC Radio interview whi
ch features some deadly people that I know talking about the topic… have a listen, I hope it gives you some valuable insight

November 12, 2013
reprezentin aborijinnl kultcha: popli-kids: I just really want to get this straight, okay.When...

popli-kids:

I just really want to get this straight, okay.

When describing or talking about Indigenous Australians, please avoid using:

  • Aborigine(s)
  • Abo(s)
  • Other very obvious racist terms that I feel I don’t need to mention here.

These words have racist and negative connotations…

November 11, 2013
Why I burned my 'Proof of Aboriginality'

racistwhiteppl:

lmao the tag “someone has put my thoughts that i’m not allowed to have because i’m white into words”

like here’s the thing hotsauce.

the point that the author and, apparently, you, choose to miss is that there are indigenous people who don’t have the privileges we have of internet access, proximity to the wild and free job market, abundant accessible education and training opportunities etc. and those people are the people that need a foothold into said wild and free job market with indigenous-designated jobs. there’s also cultural sensitivity issues that are theoretically addressed by indigenous-only jobs.

the idea that indigenous-only designations take jobs away from the pool of dedicated, talented, skilled applicants isn’t true - the people who are all too glad to fuck with the system for easy money and then later hold themselves up as an example of it being broken are the problem. those are the people literally taking jobs that should go to talented, skilled, dedicated applicants.

like you feel like you’re taking the job from someone more deserving? then fucking move on, don’t hang onto the position just so’s you can write bullshit articles declaring a system which you took advantage of to be a write-off. professional fuckin aborigine. “I used to identify as Aboriginal”. it must be nice to be able to so cast off like that so neatly.

& you? you don’t look magically not racist because you’re using someone else’s words. you’re bullshit.

I know violence isn’t the answer, but then their are people who burn the proof of Aboriginality and others who use this same BS to be blatantly racist!

(Source: mekhack)

October 29, 2013
"I am on the BasicsCard like thousands of my people. I am capable of acting in an internationally-acclaimed drama for our national broadcaster, but because I’m black and from the NT, the government says I’m incapable of managing a Centrelink payment."

Patricia Morton-Thomas, "My Family is Calling for Justice" (New Matilda)

(Source: mediamattress)

October 29, 2013

nirkalla:

That was the story of Vincent Lingairri but this is the story of something much more. How power and privilege can not move a people, who know where they stand and stand in the law.’

I’ve been writing a 1500 word essay about Indigenous Rights and Aboriginal Activism throughout Australia’s history today. So proud to know that these are my brothers and sisters!

So moved by what Indigenous political activists like Charles Perkins and Noel Pearson have done in regards to achieving native title, land rights, equality and constitutional recognition in our past.

Please don’t put Noel Pearson any where near Charles Perkins or Vincent Lingairri… unless you can actually point out the good that he has done. 

September 15, 2013
National Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Youth Coalition - Natsiyc

Membership drive starts tomorrow… give us a follow and get involved 

Indigenous advocacy by Indigenous Leaders

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